Decentralization and accountability in charter school reform [electronic resource] : A social and cultural perspective.

Vasudeva, Ash
Bib ID
vtls000568366
稽核項
251 p.
電子版
附註項
數位化論文典藏聯盟
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$a Decentralization and accountability in charter school reform $h [electronic resource] : $b A social and cultural perspective.
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$a 251 p.
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$a Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 61-06, Section: A, page: 2138.
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$a Chair:  Amy Stuart Wells.
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$a Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of California, Los Angeles, 2000.
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$a The quest for academic accountability is a recurring trend among school reform efforts. Throughout the 1990s, states have linked centralized systems of standards and assessments to policies that decentralize local school governance. Despite the popular underlying-logic that “autonomy” can be exchanged for “accountability,” little research explores how educators in decentralized schools understand and operationalize accountability in their daily practice. Using charter school reform as a window into decentralized settings, this qualitative, comparative case-study examines how educators in two California charter schools made meaning of accountability in relation to their social and cultural contexts.
520
$a The study suggests that the implementation of accountability-based reform is not a predictable process that mirrors policy discourse. Rather, it shows how rational and technical policy frameworks for accountability are complicated by social and cultural features of local schools. Specifically, this study indicates that educators' basic beliefs about accountability—to whom they are accountable, and for what—are influenced by ideological diversity and existing power relationships.
520
$a Ideological diversity over whether schools should be accountable to parents versus the state, and how schools should be organized to meet the needs of all students, suggest competing visions of accountability in decentralized settings. One implication of this finding is that policies designed to align decentralized schools with state-driven accountability systems may be undermined by conflicting attitudes and beliefs about how schools should demonstrate accountability in practice.
520
$a Although educators described competing views of accountability, existing power relationships structured whose vision was ultimately implemented. This finding suggests that formal (district-level) and informal (community-level) power relations stabilize reform implementation in decentralized settings. As a result, accountability-based reforms may be implemented in ways that prioritize the goals and interests of existing institutions and/or well-to-do or socially-connected students and families above others.
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$a 數位化論文典藏聯盟 $b PQDT $c 中山大學(2001~2002)
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$a Education, Administration.
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$a Education, Curriculum and Instruction.
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$a Educational sociology.
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$a Wells, Amy Stuart, $e advisor
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$a University of California, Los Angeles.
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$t Dissertation Abstracts International $g 61-06A.
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$u http://info.lib.tku.edu.tw/ebook/redirect.asp?bibid=568366
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摘要
The quest for academic accountability is a recurring trend among school reform efforts. Throughout the 1990s, states have linked centralized systems of standards and assessments to policies that decentralize local school governance. Despite the popular underlying-logic that “autonomy” can be exchanged for “accountability,” little research explores how educators in decentralized schools understand and operationalize accountability in their daily practice. Using charter school reform as a window into decentralized settings, this qualitative, comparative case-study examines how educators in two California charter schools made meaning of accountability in relation to their social and cultural contexts.
The study suggests that the implementation of accountability-based reform is not a predictable process that mirrors policy discourse. Rather, it shows how rational and technical policy frameworks for accountability are complicated by social and cultural features of local schools. Specifically, this study indicates that educators' basic beliefs about accountability—to whom they are accountable, and for what—are influenced by ideological diversity and existing power relationships.
Ideological diversity over whether schools should be accountable to parents versus the state, and how schools should be organized to meet the needs of all students, suggest competing visions of accountability in decentralized settings. One implication of this finding is that policies designed to align decentralized schools with state-driven accountability systems may be undermined by conflicting attitudes and beliefs about how schools should demonstrate accountability in practice.
Although educators described competing views of accountability, existing power relationships structured whose vision was ultimately implemented. This finding suggests that formal (district-level) and informal (community-level) power relations stabilize reform implementation in decentralized settings. As a result, accountability-based reforms may be implemented in ways that prioritize the goals and interests of existing institutions and/or well-to-do or socially-connected students and families above others.
附註
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 61-06, Section: A, page: 2138.
Chair: Amy Stuart Wells.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of California, Los Angeles, 2000.
數位化論文典藏聯盟
合著者
ISBN/ISSN
0599819642