Career marginality [electronic resource] : Characteristics and employment situation of registered nurses who work in long-term care facilities and hospitals / Ronald Carl Schultz.

Schultz, Ronald Carl.
Bib ID
vtls001053999
出版項
Ann Arbor, Mich. : ProQuest Information and learning
稽核項
181 p.
電子版
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$a Schultz, Ronald Carl.
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$a Career marginality $h [electronic resource] : $b Characteristics and employment situation of registered nurses who work in long-term care facilities and hospitals / $c Ronald Carl Schultz.
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$a Ann Arbor, Mich. : $b ProQuest Information and learning
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$a 181 p.
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$a Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 51-05, Section: B, page: 2289.
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$a Chairman: Michael L. Radelet.
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$a Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 1989.
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$a Using secondary data analysis, this study compares registered nurses (RNs) who work in long-term care facilities with RNs who work in hospitals. Among health care professionals, employment in long-term care facilities tends not to be considered a high status position. Additionally, factors such as greater career opportunity and higher pay seem to place hospitals in a more favorable position in recruiting qualified, career oriented RNs. This situation creates a dilemma for long-term care facilities, where there is a critical need for such nurses.
520
$a The central concept of the study is "career marginality," which is defined as the occupational situation of long-term care facility employment, as well as individual demographic and employment characteristics of RNs which might make them less qualified or desirable from the perspective of employers, or less career oriented from a personal standpoint. Using data from the 1980 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses II, multiple logistic regression analysis was used to investigate career marginality.
520
$a It was hypothesized that RNs having the following marginal characteristics were more likely to be employed in long-term care facilities than in hospitals: (a) limited formal education, (b) current nonpursuit of a higher academic degree, (c) nonparticipation in continuing education, (d) part-time employment, (e) limited percent of time employed in nursing since graduation from basic nursing education, (f) being in an older age category, and (g) having the family responsibility of children at home. Findings revealed that hospital employed RNs were less likely to have these marginal characteristics than RNs employed in long-term care facility RNs. It was also hypothesized that a nonmarginal career orientation--operationally defined as full-time employment, having been employed in nursing 80% or more of the time since graduation from basic nursing education, and participation in continuing education--would be more likely to exist among hospital employed RNs. Results indicated that this was the case. The significance of the study findings is the implications they might have for adequately providing an acceptable standard of care for the rapidly growing number of elderly people in long-term care facilities.
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$a Gerontology.
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$a Health Sciences, Nursing.
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$a University of Florida.
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摘要
Using secondary data analysis, this study compares registered nurses (RNs) who work in long-term care facilities with RNs who work in hospitals. Among health care professionals, employment in long-term care facilities tends not to be considered a high status position. Additionally, factors such as greater career opportunity and higher pay seem to place hospitals in a more favorable position in recruiting qualified, career oriented RNs. This situation creates a dilemma for long-term care facilities, where there is a critical need for such nurses.
The central concept of the study is "career marginality," which is defined as the occupational situation of long-term care facility employment, as well as individual demographic and employment characteristics of RNs which might make them less qualified or desirable from the perspective of employers, or less career oriented from a personal standpoint. Using data from the 1980 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses II, multiple logistic regression analysis was used to investigate career marginality.
It was hypothesized that RNs having the following marginal characteristics were more likely to be employed in long-term care facilities than in hospitals: (a) limited formal education, (b) current nonpursuit of a higher academic degree, (c) nonparticipation in continuing education, (d) part-time employment, (e) limited percent of time employed in nursing since graduation from basic nursing education, (f) being in an older age category, and (g) having the family responsibility of children at home. Findings revealed that hospital employed RNs were less likely to have these marginal characteristics than RNs employed in long-term care facility RNs. It was also hypothesized that a nonmarginal career orientation--operationally defined as full-time employment, having been employed in nursing 80% or more of the time since graduation from basic nursing education, and participation in continuing education--would be more likely to exist among hospital employed RNs. Results indicated that this was the case. The significance of the study findings is the implications they might have for adequately providing an acceptable standard of care for the rapidly growing number of elderly people in long-term care facilities.
附註
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 51-05, Section: B, page: 2289.
Chairman: Michael L. Radelet.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 1989.
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