Evaluating technology business incubator as a tool of government intervention [electronic resource] : Public vs private / Yongseok Jang

Jang, Yongseok.
Bib ID
vtls000988351
稽核項
222 p.
電子版
附註項
數位化論文典藏聯盟
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$a Evaluating technology business incubator as a tool of government intervention $h [electronic resource] : $b Public vs private / $c Yongseok Jang
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$a 222 p.
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$a Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 70-12, Section: A, page: .
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$a Adviser: Chris Silver.
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$a Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2009.
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$a Mixed results from empirical studies concerning the effectiveness of Technology business incubators (TBI) raise questions of the role of local government as a legitimate sponsor of incubators. In response to the current debate on the role of government in incubator program, this study undertakes a comparative evaluation to assess the differences both in selection of inputs and in outcomes between public and private technology incubators.
520
$a The primary question examined through this research is whether publicly funded technology business incubators could be substituted by private ones. The following questions guide this assessment. (1) What are the implications of public engagement in incubator program? (2) Are there any significant differences between them in the level of performance? (3) What are the major differences that might lead incubators to succeed or fail? (4) How should public incubators be guided to promote better performance?
520
$a Using case study methodology, this research studies exemplar incubators of different sponsorship types to observe roles of public engagement for different sponsorships. Using National Establishment Time Series (NETS) data base, this research then conducts two-group comparison to exam whether performances of TBIs differ by sponsorships, in terms of sales, wages and employment.
520
$a By synthesizing findings of the case studies and quantitative findings of performance of client companies, this research concludes, that public resources may play important roles for operation of TBIs in the US. In regards to the differences in the inputs, the differences in the status and capacity of the resources provided to each sponsor may drive the differences in services and strategies. Based on the findings about primary performance, none of the two sponsorships dominates in terms of efficiency, while several differences are observed. These findings altogether imply that the old fashioned private-public framework might not be appropriate for this subject. An alternative perspective may be that the roles of public TBIs may need to be diversified. The public sector may find an active role in utilizing large-scale capital. It also means that the public sector may step back from operating tasks, as the private sector may respond to the market dynamics more effectively.
591
$a 數位化論文典藏聯盟 $b PQDT $c 淡江大學(2009)
653
$a Political Science, Public Administration.
653
$a Urban and Regional Planning.
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$a University of Florida.
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$a Dissertation Abstracts International ; $v 70-12A.
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$u http://info.lib.tku.edu.tw/ebook/redirect.asp?bibid=988351
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$a VIRTUA00
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叢書名
Dissertation Abstracts International ; 70-12A.
摘要
Mixed results from empirical studies concerning the effectiveness of Technology business incubators (TBI) raise questions of the role of local government as a legitimate sponsor of incubators. In response to the current debate on the role of government in incubator program, this study undertakes a comparative evaluation to assess the differences both in selection of inputs and in outcomes between public and private technology incubators.
The primary question examined through this research is whether publicly funded technology business incubators could be substituted by private ones. The following questions guide this assessment. (1) What are the implications of public engagement in incubator program? (2) Are there any significant differences between them in the level of performance? (3) What are the major differences that might lead incubators to succeed or fail? (4) How should public incubators be guided to promote better performance?
Using case study methodology, this research studies exemplar incubators of different sponsorship types to observe roles of public engagement for different sponsorships. Using National Establishment Time Series (NETS) data base, this research then conducts two-group comparison to exam whether performances of TBIs differ by sponsorships, in terms of sales, wages and employment.
By synthesizing findings of the case studies and quantitative findings of performance of client companies, this research concludes, that public resources may play important roles for operation of TBIs in the US. In regards to the differences in the inputs, the differences in the status and capacity of the resources provided to each sponsor may drive the differences in services and strategies. Based on the findings about primary performance, none of the two sponsorships dominates in terms of efficiency, while several differences are observed. These findings altogether imply that the old fashioned private-public framework might not be appropriate for this subject. An alternative perspective may be that the roles of public TBIs may need to be diversified. The public sector may find an active role in utilizing large-scale capital. It also means that the public sector may step back from operating tasks, as the private sector may respond to the market dynamics more effectively.
附註
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 70-12, Section: A, page: .
Adviser: Chris Silver.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Florida, 2009.
數位化論文典藏聯盟
合著者
ISBN/ISSN
9781109520989