Choosing compromised sovereignty [electronic resource] : Nationalist movements negotiate European integration (Wales, Flanders) / Janet Marie Laible

Laible, Janet Marie
Bib ID
vtls000605324
稽核項
453 p.
電子版
附註項
數位化論文典藏聯盟
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$a Choosing compromised sovereignty $h [electronic resource] : $b Nationalist movements negotiate European integration (Wales, Flanders) / $c Janet Marie Laible
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$a 453 p.
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$a Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 63-03, Section: A, page: 1115.
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$a Director: David R. Cameron.
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$a Thesis (Ph.D.)--Yale University, 2002.
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$a Numerous nationalist parties are committed to achieving self-government in an integrating Europe. Yet for a nationalist party to seek a separate state <italic>and</italic> an overarching political and economic regulatory framework might seem nothing more than a surrender of the sovereignty that nationalists claim rightly belongs in the hands of the nation. This dissertation investigates the European dimension of politics for three nationalist parties: the Scottish National Party (SNP); Plaid Cymru in Wales, and the Vlaams Blok in Flanders, from 1985 to 1996. I argue that these parties share common goals in their European politics: they use Europe as a set of resources to help question the legitimacy of their respective states, and as a new participatory arena in which to publicize their struggles and to mobilize domestic support. I present evidence that nationalist parties use the context of an integrating Europe for strategic positioning in their domestic electoral campaigns and as an intellectual framework in which to situate demands for self-government. They participate in European institutions in a quest for tangible and symbolic benefits for their constituents, to demonstrate commitment to a self-described &lsquo;national interest&rsquo;, and to assert their right to be recognized as national leaders.
520
$a Five factors shape nationalist strategies with respect to the EU: the long-term constitutional agenda of the party; the concept of the nation articulated by the party; the availability of political entrepreneurs who recognize the strategic value of &lsquo;Europe&rsquo; and can win internal party support for their ideas; ideological orientation; and the structure of domestic party competition. Yet participation in EU politics alters nationalist strategies by introducing tensions into nationalist politics about the nature of sovereignty. Party leaders therefore attempt to manage these tensions by asserting that self-government with limited sovereignty in the EU is preferable to the constitutional status quo. I conclude that the supranationalism that appears to challenge nationalism simultaneously provides nationalists with ammunition to strengthen their cases, if not to fight their battles, for self-government.
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$a 數位化論文典藏聯盟 $b PQDT $c 淡江大學(2004)
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$a Political science.
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$a Yale University.
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$t Dissertation Abstracts International $g 63-03A.
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摘要
Numerous nationalist parties are committed to achieving self-government in an integrating Europe. Yet for a nationalist party to seek a separate state <italic>and</italic> an overarching political and economic regulatory framework might seem nothing more than a surrender of the sovereignty that nationalists claim rightly belongs in the hands of the nation. This dissertation investigates the European dimension of politics for three nationalist parties: the Scottish National Party (SNP); Plaid Cymru in Wales, and the Vlaams Blok in Flanders, from 1985 to 1996. I argue that these parties share common goals in their European politics: they use Europe as a set of resources to help question the legitimacy of their respective states, and as a new participatory arena in which to publicize their struggles and to mobilize domestic support. I present evidence that nationalist parties use the context of an integrating Europe for strategic positioning in their domestic electoral campaigns and as an intellectual framework in which to situate demands for self-government. They participate in European institutions in a quest for tangible and symbolic benefits for their constituents, to demonstrate commitment to a self-described &lsquo;national interest&rsquo;, and to assert their right to be recognized as national leaders.
Five factors shape nationalist strategies with respect to the EU: the long-term constitutional agenda of the party; the concept of the nation articulated by the party; the availability of political entrepreneurs who recognize the strategic value of &lsquo;Europe&rsquo; and can win internal party support for their ideas; ideological orientation; and the structure of domestic party competition. Yet participation in EU politics alters nationalist strategies by introducing tensions into nationalist politics about the nature of sovereignty. Party leaders therefore attempt to manage these tensions by asserting that self-government with limited sovereignty in the EU is preferable to the constitutional status quo. I conclude that the supranationalism that appears to challenge nationalism simultaneously provides nationalists with ammunition to strengthen their cases, if not to fight their battles, for self-government.
附註
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 63-03, Section: A, page: 1115.
Director: David R. Cameron.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Yale University, 2002.
數位化論文典藏聯盟
合著者
ISBN/ISSN
0493603921