The Mayan in the mall [electronic resource] : Culture, development, and globalization in Guatemala, 1920--2003 / John Thomas Way.

Way, John Thomas.
Bib ID
vtls001052975
出版項
Ann Arbor, Mich. : ProQuest Information and learning
稽核項
431 p.
電子版
附註項
數位化論文典藏聯盟
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$a The Mayan in the mall $h [electronic resource] : $b Culture, development, and globalization in Guatemala, 1920--2003 / $c John Thomas Way.
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$a Ann Arbor, Mich. : $b ProQuest Information and learning
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$a 431 p.
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$a Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 67-04, Section: A, page: 1493.
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$a Adviser:  Gilbert M. Joseph.
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$a Thesis (Ph.D.)--Yale University, 2006.
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$a Guatemala is considered both underdeveloped and pre-modern. This is not the case. In fact, Guatemala serves as a virtual case study of modernist, corporate capitalist development. Infrastructure development projects and modernist discourses that coalesced in the 1920s shaped the physical and commercial landscape, affected the creation of the contemporary national imaginary, and "developed" this putatively "underdeveloped" nation in every way. Guatemala is not anachronistic; it is futuristic. Its poverty, informal economy, ethnic regionalism, and history of genocidal violence are all the results of its development.
520
$a The Mayan in the Mall maps transnational developmental discourse and projects against the creation and growth of inner-city neighborhoods and municipal markets in Guatemala City from 1920 to 2003. It argues that the popular concept of "development" is a myth, as is the very notion of an "informal economy," which in fact sustains nearly all human life in the nation. It also contends that Mayan and brown-skinned mestizo bodies have come to symbolize the nation's backwardness.
520
$a Furthermore, the dissertation examines the gendered dimensions of development and space-creation. Women, the study shows, were protagonists in local business, even as mythic notions of a stable nuclear family informed government projects and bureaucracy-building. Dangerous male juvenile delinquents, meanwhile, have become the scapegoats for the product of years of capitalist development. Far from being absent, that development was imposed by transnational capital, the national economic and military elite, and over thirty years of constant war. The war ended because "development" won, resulting in a landscape in which power was more concentrated even as it paradoxically came to appear more fragmented. Guatemala became a post-Cold-War "democracy" with a crippled left wing---a nation every day more "underdeveloped" thanks to development itself. Guatemala, despite its bucolic Mayan charm, is a paradigm of corporate capitalist development in the Western Hemisphere.
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$a 數位化論文典藏聯盟 $b PQDT $c 淡江大學(2007)
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摘要
Guatemala is considered both underdeveloped and pre-modern. This is not the case. In fact, Guatemala serves as a virtual case study of modernist, corporate capitalist development. Infrastructure development projects and modernist discourses that coalesced in the 1920s shaped the physical and commercial landscape, affected the creation of the contemporary national imaginary, and "developed" this putatively "underdeveloped" nation in every way. Guatemala is not anachronistic; it is futuristic. Its poverty, informal economy, ethnic regionalism, and history of genocidal violence are all the results of its development.
The Mayan in the Mall maps transnational developmental discourse and projects against the creation and growth of inner-city neighborhoods and municipal markets in Guatemala City from 1920 to 2003. It argues that the popular concept of "development" is a myth, as is the very notion of an "informal economy," which in fact sustains nearly all human life in the nation. It also contends that Mayan and brown-skinned mestizo bodies have come to symbolize the nation's backwardness.
Furthermore, the dissertation examines the gendered dimensions of development and space-creation. Women, the study shows, were protagonists in local business, even as mythic notions of a stable nuclear family informed government projects and bureaucracy-building. Dangerous male juvenile delinquents, meanwhile, have become the scapegoats for the product of years of capitalist development. Far from being absent, that development was imposed by transnational capital, the national economic and military elite, and over thirty years of constant war. The war ended because "development" won, resulting in a landscape in which power was more concentrated even as it paradoxically came to appear more fragmented. Guatemala became a post-Cold-War "democracy" with a crippled left wing---a nation every day more "underdeveloped" thanks to development itself. Guatemala, despite its bucolic Mayan charm, is a paradigm of corporate capitalist development in the Western Hemisphere.
附註
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 67-04, Section: A, page: 1493.
Adviser: Gilbert M. Joseph.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Yale University, 2006.
數位化論文典藏聯盟
合著者
ISBN/ISSN
9780542658181