Manufacturing reality [electronic resource] : Gender, culture, and the resolution of everyday moral conflicts / Janet Shakuntala Walker.

Walker, Janet Shakuntala.
Bib ID
vtls001054730
出版項
Ann Arbor, Mich. : ProQuest Information and learning
稽核項
303 p.
電子版
預約人數:0
全部評等: 0
沒有紀錄。
 
 
 
02719nam a2200325 a 4500
001
 
 
vtls001054730
003
 
 
VRT
005
 
 
20071225063900.0
006
 
 
m        d 
008
 
 
071225s1997    miu||||||m   |000 0|eng d
020
$a 9780591390582
035
$a (UMI)AAI9729890
039
9
$y 200712250639 $z VLOAD
040
$a UMI $b eng $c UMI
100
1
$a Walker, Janet Shakuntala.
245
1
0
$a Manufacturing reality $h [electronic resource] : $b Gender, culture, and the resolution of everyday moral conflicts / $c Janet Shakuntala Walker.
260
$a Ann Arbor, Mich. : $b ProQuest Information and learning
300
$a 303 p.
500
$a Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 58-04, Section: B, page: 2159.
500
$a Adviser: Richard Shweder.
502
$a Thesis (Ph.D.)--The University of Chicago, 1997.
520
$a This dissertation is an investigation of similarities and differences between men and women, and between people of different sub-cultural backgrounds in the interpretation and resolution of everyday conflicts in the workplace. One of the major lines of argumentation in the dissertation is that conflicts almost always revolve around different interpretations of the moral meaning or the justice implications of a situation, and the dissertation presents a model of the development of the interpretive processes by means of which people understand and respond to conflict situations.
520
$a The dissertation reports the results of observational research in an automobile parts manufacturing factory during a period of three years. Also reported are the results of a content analysis of more than 3500 narratives collected during semi-structured interviews with 60 male and female African-American, Caucasian-American, and immigrant Mexican-American production-line workers. The narratives describe situations in which people encountered conflicts regarding their rights and duties at work. Evidence is presented in support of the hypothesis that people's strategies for dealing with conflicts are influenced by three factors in their development: cultural or sub-cultural socialization, including socialization into gender roles; access to power; and the availability of support for resistance to power. Discussion highlights evidence from the analyses which point to gender and sub-culture differences in the interpretation and management of conflict situations.
653
$a Women's Studies.
653
$a Psychology, Developmental.
653
$a Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
710
2
0
$a The University of Chicago.
773
0
$t ABI/INFORM Global (ProQuest) $g 58-04B.
856
4
1
$u http://info.lib.tku.edu.tw/ebook/redirect.asp?bibid=1054730
999
$a VIRTUA00
沒有評論
摘要
This dissertation is an investigation of similarities and differences between men and women, and between people of different sub-cultural backgrounds in the interpretation and resolution of everyday conflicts in the workplace. One of the major lines of argumentation in the dissertation is that conflicts almost always revolve around different interpretations of the moral meaning or the justice implications of a situation, and the dissertation presents a model of the development of the interpretive processes by means of which people understand and respond to conflict situations.
The dissertation reports the results of observational research in an automobile parts manufacturing factory during a period of three years. Also reported are the results of a content analysis of more than 3500 narratives collected during semi-structured interviews with 60 male and female African-American, Caucasian-American, and immigrant Mexican-American production-line workers. The narratives describe situations in which people encountered conflicts regarding their rights and duties at work. Evidence is presented in support of the hypothesis that people's strategies for dealing with conflicts are influenced by three factors in their development: cultural or sub-cultural socialization, including socialization into gender roles; access to power; and the availability of support for resistance to power. Discussion highlights evidence from the analyses which point to gender and sub-culture differences in the interpretation and management of conflict situations.
附註
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 58-04, Section: B, page: 2159.
Adviser: Richard Shweder.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--The University of Chicago, 1997.
合著者
ISBN/ISSN
9780591390582