Digital literacy: How to measure browsing behavior. [electronic resource]

Dietrichson, Aleksander.
Bib ID
vtls000561077
稽核項
195 p.
電子版
附註項
數位化論文典藏聯盟
預約人數:0
全部評等: 0
沒有紀錄。
 
 
 
03701nam a2200349   4500
001
 
 
vtls000561077
003
 
 
VRT
005
 
 
20021024103400.0
008
 
 
021024s2001    ||||||||||||||00| ||eng d
020
$a 0493152091
035
$a (UnM)AAI3005712
039
9
$y 200210241034 $z sujenlee
040
$a UnM $c UnM
100
1
$a Dietrichson, Aleksander.
245
1
0
$a Digital literacy:  How to measure browsing behavior. $h [electronic resource]
300
$a 195 p.
500
$a Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 62-02, Section: A, page: 0523.
500
$a Sponsor:  Clifford Hill.
502
$a Thesis (Ph.D.)--Columbia University, 2001.
520
$a This experimental study analyzed access logs from 30 graduate students, fifteen native speakers of English and fifteen native speakers of Korean, who are graduate students at Teachers College, Columbia University. These students were searching online for information to answer five questions, using a web site that provides information about AIDS. This web site is typical of many public service sites in that it provides a great deal of information but is not well organized. Students were required to retrieve information not only from four levels within the information hierarchy, but also from beyond the web site. Student success in retrieving information was measured by (1) the number of correct answers they supplied, and (2) the amount of time they used to find them. On the basis of these two measures, students were categorized into three groups: (1) power users, (2) proficient users, and (3) less than proficient users.
520
$a The native speakers of English generally performed better than the native speakers of Korean (even though the latter reported themselves as having slightly more computer experience), as indicated by the following results: (1) power users: 4 English speakers; (2) 3 Korean speakers; (3) proficient users: 10 English speakers, 8 Korean speakers less than proficient users: 10 English speakers, 4 Korean speakers.
520
$a The superior performance of the native speakers of English is not surprising, since traditional reading skills in English remain an important factor in any online search for information, especially if the information itself is not well organized. Gender did not, however, correlate with success, especially when computer experience was controlled for.
520
$a Based on the overall quantitative analyses, the performance of six students was studied in greater depth (one native speaker of English and one native speaker of Korean at each of the three levels). Graphical displays were generated that represented the precis itinerary followed by each of these students. Using these graphic displays, a spaghetticity measure was generated to index the proficiency of an individual user. Crucial to individual proficiency were a number of specific measures such as the ratio of unique pages to total pages visited. These case studies also revealed that poor design of the search engine and inconsistent navigation bars confused the proficient and less than proficient users, even though the power users were able to overcome these problems.
591
$a 數位化論文典藏聯盟 $b PQDT $c 淡江大學(2001~2002)
650
4
$a Education, Sociology of.
650
4
$a Education, Technology.
650
4
$a Information Science.
710
2
0
$a Columbia University.
773
0
$t Dissertation Abstracts International $g 62-02A.
856
4
0
$u http://info.lib.tku.edu.tw/ebook/redirect.asp?bibid=561077
999
$a VIRTUA           m
999
$a VTLSSORT0080*0200*0350*0400*1000*2450*3000*5000*5001*5020*5200*5201*5202*5203*6500*6501*6502*7100*7730*8560*9990*9991
沒有評論
標題
摘要
This experimental study analyzed access logs from 30 graduate students, fifteen native speakers of English and fifteen native speakers of Korean, who are graduate students at Teachers College, Columbia University. These students were searching online for information to answer five questions, using a web site that provides information about AIDS. This web site is typical of many public service sites in that it provides a great deal of information but is not well organized. Students were required to retrieve information not only from four levels within the information hierarchy, but also from beyond the web site. Student success in retrieving information was measured by (1) the number of correct answers they supplied, and (2) the amount of time they used to find them. On the basis of these two measures, students were categorized into three groups: (1) power users, (2) proficient users, and (3) less than proficient users.
The native speakers of English generally performed better than the native speakers of Korean (even though the latter reported themselves as having slightly more computer experience), as indicated by the following results: (1) power users: 4 English speakers; (2) 3 Korean speakers; (3) proficient users: 10 English speakers, 8 Korean speakers less than proficient users: 10 English speakers, 4 Korean speakers.
The superior performance of the native speakers of English is not surprising, since traditional reading skills in English remain an important factor in any online search for information, especially if the information itself is not well organized. Gender did not, however, correlate with success, especially when computer experience was controlled for.
Based on the overall quantitative analyses, the performance of six students was studied in greater depth (one native speaker of English and one native speaker of Korean at each of the three levels). Graphical displays were generated that represented the precis itinerary followed by each of these students. Using these graphic displays, a spaghetticity measure was generated to index the proficiency of an individual user. Crucial to individual proficiency were a number of specific measures such as the ratio of unique pages to total pages visited. These case studies also revealed that poor design of the search engine and inconsistent navigation bars confused the proficient and less than proficient users, even though the power users were able to overcome these problems.
附註
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 62-02, Section: A, page: 0523.
Sponsor: Clifford Hill.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Columbia University, 2001.
數位化論文典藏聯盟
合著者
ISBN/ISSN
0493152091