Team dispersion: [electronic resource]/ The effect of geographical dispersion team process and performance. Sheira. Ariel

Ariel, Sheira.
Bib ID
vtls000566506
稽核項
115 p.
電子版
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$a Team dispersion: $h [electronic resource]/ $b The effect of geographical dispersion team process and performance. $c Sheira. Ariel
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$a 115 p.
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$a Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 61-09, Section: A, page: 3645.
500
$a Adviser:  Joel Podolny.
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$a Thesis (Ph.D.)--Stanford University, 2000.
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$a Dispersed teams—teams whose members are geographically distributed across different locations—are becoming more prevalent in today's organizations. Despite their increasing prevalence, the empirical research on these teams has been surprisingly scant. The research that has been conducted in this area has typically occurred in the laboratory or with the use of student teams.
520
$a In this dissertation, I uncover the effect of geographical dispersion on team communication, coordination, and performance and examine whether task interdependence and task uncertainty moderate the effect of dispersion on teams. I introduce two theoretical lenses through which I explore how dispersion can impact teams. While theoretical and empirical work on proximity suggests that dispersed teams will be associated with communication and coordination problems, and, hence with lower levels of performance, network theory suggests that dispersed teams may be associated with non-redundant information benefits that can increase team performance. Writings of organizational theory suggest that task interdependence and task uncertainty would exacerbate the negative effect of dispersion on coordination problems and team performance. Data was collected through a field study of 85 process improvement teams in a large, multinational organization in the high-tech industry. The members of these teams are distributed across geographies and time zones. Spatial and temporal dispersion were not related to the amount of communication problems experienced by the team, but they were positively related to the amount of coordination problems experienced by the team. Interestingly, when controlling for such process loss, spatial and temporal dispersion were found to be positively and significantly associated with team performance. No evidence was found for the existence of boundary conditions; task interdependence and task uncertainty did not moderate the effect of dispersion on coordination problems and performance in the expected direction. This study therefore reveals countervailing effects of geographical dispersion on teams: while dispersion appears to negatively impact coordination, it appears to be beneficial for the team's output.
650
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$a Business Administration, Management.
650
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$a Psychology, Industrial.
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$a Podolny, Joel, $e advisor
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$a Stanford University.
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$u http://info.lib.tku.edu.tw/ebook/redirect.asp?bibid=566506
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摘要
Dispersed teams—teams whose members are geographically distributed across different locations—are becoming more prevalent in today's organizations. Despite their increasing prevalence, the empirical research on these teams has been surprisingly scant. The research that has been conducted in this area has typically occurred in the laboratory or with the use of student teams.
In this dissertation, I uncover the effect of geographical dispersion on team communication, coordination, and performance and examine whether task interdependence and task uncertainty moderate the effect of dispersion on teams. I introduce two theoretical lenses through which I explore how dispersion can impact teams. While theoretical and empirical work on proximity suggests that dispersed teams will be associated with communication and coordination problems, and, hence with lower levels of performance, network theory suggests that dispersed teams may be associated with non-redundant information benefits that can increase team performance. Writings of organizational theory suggest that task interdependence and task uncertainty would exacerbate the negative effect of dispersion on coordination problems and team performance. Data was collected through a field study of 85 process improvement teams in a large, multinational organization in the high-tech industry. The members of these teams are distributed across geographies and time zones. Spatial and temporal dispersion were not related to the amount of communication problems experienced by the team, but they were positively related to the amount of coordination problems experienced by the team. Interestingly, when controlling for such process loss, spatial and temporal dispersion were found to be positively and significantly associated with team performance. No evidence was found for the existence of boundary conditions; task interdependence and task uncertainty did not moderate the effect of dispersion on coordination problems and performance in the expected direction. This study therefore reveals countervailing effects of geographical dispersion on teams: while dispersion appears to negatively impact coordination, it appears to be beneficial for the team's output.
附註
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 61-09, Section: A, page: 3645.
Adviser: Joel Podolny.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Stanford University, 2000.
合著者
ISBN/ISSN
0599926503