Newcomers, oldtimers, and relative tenure: [electronic resource] / Organizational assimilation as an outcome of social comparison. Keith Wesley. Rollag

Rollag, Keith Wesley.
Bib ID
vtls000566519
稽核項
176 p.
電子版
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$a Newcomers, oldtimers, and relative tenure: $h [electronic resource] / $b Organizational assimilation as an outcome of social comparison. $c Keith Wesley. Rollag
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$a 176 p.
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$a Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 61-09, Section: A, page: 3655.
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$a Adviser:  Stephen R. Barley.
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$a Thesis (Ph.D.)--Stanford University, 2000.
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$a Current theories of socialization characterize the newcomer-to-oldtimer transition as a slow, gradual outcome of knowledge acquisition taking <italic> years</italic> to complete. However, in young, fast-growing startups, members begin to think and act like old-timers in just a few <italic>months</italic>. In trying to explain this anomaly, I've uncovered and challenged several implicit assumptions embedded in current theories of socialization. Organizations are not comprised of homogeneous groups of newcomers and oldtimers, but contain members with a diverse mix of perceived &ldquo;newness&rdquo;. In most organizations <italic> newcomer</italic> is not an explicit organizational role but an implicit label whose &ldquo;attachment strength&rdquo; decreases over time.
520
$a To avoid some of these problematic assumptions and to extend socialization theory to the entire organization, I replace the static notion of &ldquo;newcomer&rdquo; with a dynamic construct called <italic>newcomerness</italic> that evaluates an individual's perceived position on the newcomer-oldtimer continuum. The results of a <italic>survey</italic> among four Silicon Valley startups; show that individuals can reliably assess their relative newcomerness in an organization, and these perceptions are related to feelings of organizational expertise, task mastery, and comfortableness among co-workers. Members who feel less like a newcomer also tend to feel more satisfied with their job and more emotionally attached to the organization.
520
$a More importantly, the results suggest that in absence of other objective cues, members use their <italic>relative tenure</italic> in the organization as an indirect measure of newness, learning progress, and assimilation extent. Socialization is not only the outcome of learning, but is also an outcome of a <italic>social comparison process</italic> that is strongly influenced by organizational growth rates and turnover dynamics. The relatively slow rate of socialization and learning observed in large, established organizations may be as much a product of their low hiring and turnover rates as it is their cultural and bureaucratic complexity.
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$a Business Administration, Management.
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$a Engineering, Industrial.
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$a Sociology, Social Structure and Development.
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$a Stanford University.
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$u http://info.lib.tku.edu.tw/ebook/redirect.asp?bibid=566519
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摘要
Current theories of socialization characterize the newcomer-to-oldtimer transition as a slow, gradual outcome of knowledge acquisition taking <italic> years</italic> to complete. However, in young, fast-growing startups, members begin to think and act like old-timers in just a few <italic>months</italic>. In trying to explain this anomaly, I've uncovered and challenged several implicit assumptions embedded in current theories of socialization. Organizations are not comprised of homogeneous groups of newcomers and oldtimers, but contain members with a diverse mix of perceived &ldquo;newness&rdquo;. In most organizations <italic> newcomer</italic> is not an explicit organizational role but an implicit label whose &ldquo;attachment strength&rdquo; decreases over time.
To avoid some of these problematic assumptions and to extend socialization theory to the entire organization, I replace the static notion of &ldquo;newcomer&rdquo; with a dynamic construct called <italic>newcomerness</italic> that evaluates an individual's perceived position on the newcomer-oldtimer continuum. The results of a <italic>survey</italic> among four Silicon Valley startups; show that individuals can reliably assess their relative newcomerness in an organization, and these perceptions are related to feelings of organizational expertise, task mastery, and comfortableness among co-workers. Members who feel less like a newcomer also tend to feel more satisfied with their job and more emotionally attached to the organization.
More importantly, the results suggest that in absence of other objective cues, members use their <italic>relative tenure</italic> in the organization as an indirect measure of newness, learning progress, and assimilation extent. Socialization is not only the outcome of learning, but is also an outcome of a <italic>social comparison process</italic> that is strongly influenced by organizational growth rates and turnover dynamics. The relatively slow rate of socialization and learning observed in large, established organizations may be as much a product of their low hiring and turnover rates as it is their cultural and bureaucratic complexity.
附註
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 61-09, Section: A, page: 3655.
Adviser: Stephen R. Barley.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Stanford University, 2000.
合著者
ISBN/ISSN
0599931809