A process study of the influence of competition between new product initiatives on innovation and organizational learning. [electronic resource] Alva H. Taylor

Taylor, Alva H.
Bib ID
vtls000566553
稽核項
274 p.
電子版
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$a A process study of the influence of competition between new product initiatives on innovation and organizational learning. $h [electronic resource] $c Alva H. Taylor
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$a 274 p.
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$a Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 61-09, Section: A, page: 3656.
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$a Adviser:  Robert Burgelman.
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$a Thesis (Ph.D.)--Stanford University, 2000.
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$a The thesis investigates innovative activity represented by new product development efforts that challenge on-going product efforts. The central argument presented is that the challenge of the innovative effort creates an organizational learning environment driven by competitive actions. The empirical setting for this research is a qualitative field study that investigates eight new product development efforts in four high technology firms. I report evidence from four matched pairs of new product efforts, one a venturing effort that is consistent with the firm's strategy and a second effort that represents a challenge to the existing firm strategy.
520
$a The first finding is that learning occurs prior to external exposure or feedback. The ambiguity of technological and strategic direction faced by the organizations allows individuals to undertake discretionary behavior of unplanned innovation. As part of the effort to keep these innovation efforts alive within the organization, new development efforts build skills and knowledge within the firm prior to external exposure to the marketplace. Additionally, competing development efforts acquire and incorporate attributes of the innovation even while lobbying against the new effort. The learning becomes ingrained in future organizational activities as competing efforts assimilate aspects of the new product effort. The resulting model provides an enriched understanding of how knowledge capacity can be developed (Cohen and Levinthal, 1990) and how internal competition hastens the acceptance of uncertain practices.
520
$a The second finding guided by the competitive perspective of learning is innovation driven by aspiration. Despite the low success probabilities, managers were still willing to support and attach themselves to the risky efforts. This behavior provides the empirical challenge to the view that managers choose projects based on success probabilities (Burns and Stalker, 1961; Burns, 1977) or unanticipated internal opportunities (Cohen, March, and Olsen, 1972). The empirical evidence is reconciled by my concept of layered selection environments, as managers attempt to enhance careers in both the internal corporate environment and the wider industry labor market for managerial and technical talent. The findings emphasize the importance of interaction and trade-offs between external and internal opportunity structures by individuals in organizations.
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$a Business Administration, Management.
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$a Stanford University.
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摘要
The thesis investigates innovative activity represented by new product development efforts that challenge on-going product efforts. The central argument presented is that the challenge of the innovative effort creates an organizational learning environment driven by competitive actions. The empirical setting for this research is a qualitative field study that investigates eight new product development efforts in four high technology firms. I report evidence from four matched pairs of new product efforts, one a venturing effort that is consistent with the firm's strategy and a second effort that represents a challenge to the existing firm strategy.
The first finding is that learning occurs prior to external exposure or feedback. The ambiguity of technological and strategic direction faced by the organizations allows individuals to undertake discretionary behavior of unplanned innovation. As part of the effort to keep these innovation efforts alive within the organization, new development efforts build skills and knowledge within the firm prior to external exposure to the marketplace. Additionally, competing development efforts acquire and incorporate attributes of the innovation even while lobbying against the new effort. The learning becomes ingrained in future organizational activities as competing efforts assimilate aspects of the new product effort. The resulting model provides an enriched understanding of how knowledge capacity can be developed (Cohen and Levinthal, 1990) and how internal competition hastens the acceptance of uncertain practices.
The second finding guided by the competitive perspective of learning is innovation driven by aspiration. Despite the low success probabilities, managers were still willing to support and attach themselves to the risky efforts. This behavior provides the empirical challenge to the view that managers choose projects based on success probabilities (Burns and Stalker, 1961; Burns, 1977) or unanticipated internal opportunities (Cohen, March, and Olsen, 1972). The empirical evidence is reconciled by my concept of layered selection environments, as managers attempt to enhance careers in both the internal corporate environment and the wider industry labor market for managerial and technical talent. The findings emphasize the importance of interaction and trade-offs between external and internal opportunity structures by individuals in organizations.
附註
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 61-09, Section: A, page: 3656.
Adviser: Robert Burgelman.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Stanford University, 2000.
合著者
ISBN/ISSN
0599932228