Lost treasure? [electronic resource] : An Arendtian study of the ethical politics of contemporary European integration (Hannah Arendt) / Catherine Blanche Guisan-Dickinson

Guisan-Dickinson, Catherine Blanche
Bib ID
vtls000571331
稽核項
347 p.
電子版
附註項
數位化論文典藏聯盟
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$a Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 61-10, Section: A, page: 4168.
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$a Adviser:  Mary G. Dietz.
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$a Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Minnesota, 2000.
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$a As it faces the twin challenges of enlargement and democratization, the European Union is searching for what Hannah Arendt calls the “lost treasure” of its tradition. This dissertation probes the phenomenon of European integration by interpreting historically and theoretically the words and actions of some of its major actors. It identifies certain ethical and political principles which have shaped actions and policies, in addition to instrumental and strategic considerations, since the founding of the European Coal and Steel Community in 1951. In five historical settings, which correspond to the ratification of important legal documents, I establish a dialogue between European decision-makers and Hannah Arendt (also Isaiah Berlin, Charles Taylor, Jürgen Habermas and Karl Jaspers). I use some of Arendt's major political concepts—natality, action, forgiveness, promise, the social, and council democracy—as interpretive lenses. But I also draw from Habermas' discourse ethics, Charles Taylor's understanding of recognition in multicultural societies, Isaiah Berlin's concept of pluralism and Karl Jaspers' discussion of political and personal accountability, to interpret the words and initiatives of European actors. I find these in memoirs and essays, treaty texts, policy studies, 17 in-depth interviews of the negotiators of the Treaties of Rome, forty interviews I conducted in 1995 and 1999 with members of the European Parliament, senior officials of the Commission, close colleagues of Jean Monnet, and in conversations with citizens. I suggest that the principle of reconciliation moved the ratification of the European Coal and Steel Treaty, the principle of compromise secured the ratification of the Treaties of Rome, and the principle of recognition contributed to past enlargements. I explore to what extent these principles, and others, could or should shape the future evolution of the European Union toward more inclusiveness and accountability. This dissertation sheds light on the relevance of Arendtian theory for European integration politics. It also contributes fresh evidence and a new interpretation of the role of ideals, and their relation to interests, in the European integration process.
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$a Political Science
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$a Europe $x History
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$a International law and relations.
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As it faces the twin challenges of enlargement and democratization, the European Union is searching for what Hannah Arendt calls the “lost treasure” of its tradition. This dissertation probes the phenomenon of European integration by interpreting historically and theoretically the words and actions of some of its major actors. It identifies certain ethical and political principles which have shaped actions and policies, in addition to instrumental and strategic considerations, since the founding of the European Coal and Steel Community in 1951. In five historical settings, which correspond to the ratification of important legal documents, I establish a dialogue between European decision-makers and Hannah Arendt (also Isaiah Berlin, Charles Taylor, Jürgen Habermas and Karl Jaspers). I use some of Arendt's major political concepts—natality, action, forgiveness, promise, the social, and council democracy—as interpretive lenses. But I also draw from Habermas' discourse ethics, Charles Taylor's understanding of recognition in multicultural societies, Isaiah Berlin's concept of pluralism and Karl Jaspers' discussion of political and personal accountability, to interpret the words and initiatives of European actors. I find these in memoirs and essays, treaty texts, policy studies, 17 in-depth interviews of the negotiators of the Treaties of Rome, forty interviews I conducted in 1995 and 1999 with members of the European Parliament, senior officials of the Commission, close colleagues of Jean Monnet, and in conversations with citizens. I suggest that the principle of reconciliation moved the ratification of the European Coal and Steel Treaty, the principle of compromise secured the ratification of the Treaties of Rome, and the principle of recognition contributed to past enlargements. I explore to what extent these principles, and others, could or should shape the future evolution of the European Union toward more inclusiveness and accountability. This dissertation sheds light on the relevance of Arendtian theory for European integration politics. It also contributes fresh evidence and a new interpretation of the role of ideals, and their relation to interests, in the European integration process.
附註
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 61-10, Section: A, page: 4168.
Adviser: Mary G. Dietz.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Minnesota, 2000.
數位化論文典藏聯盟
合著者
ISBN/ISSN
0599988169