Writers' blocks [electronic resource] : London, modernism, and the place of the literary (England, Henry James, Virginia Woolf, E. M. Forster) / Andrea Patricia Zemgulys

Zemgulys, Andrea Patricia
Bib ID
vtls000628829
出版項
Ann Arbor : ProQuest Information and learning, 2002
稽核項
293 p.
電子版
附註項
數位化論文典藏聯盟
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$a Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 62-07, Section: A, page: 2439.
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$a Chair: Elizabeth Abel.
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$a Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of California, Berkeley, 2001.
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$a At the turn of the twentieth century, London modernized itself in part by creating sites which gave social and material form to the reading, writing, and understanding of literature. These "literary" places made order and meaning out of the city's rapid demographic and geographic transformations, and thereby became signs of London's modernity as much as its wider streets and grander hotels. From the museums and memorials dedicated to writers' lives and works, to the lecture halls and institutes dedicated to humane learning and culture, "literary" places in turn-of-the-century London became sites of memory and of education for modern Londoners. My dissertation argues that the phantasmagoric and "unreal cities" of modernism are not simply reflections of an alienating and always changing urban environment, nor simply the product of effete "groups" and coteries, but are complex responses to the institutional, regulated, and planned spaces of "literary" memory and education. The first chapter examines the emergence of these literary places in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century London, and demonstrates how they represented attempts at modernizing the city. The second chapter explores how the production of London's literary memory grew out of the organization of literary tourism in Victorian England, and how both Henry James and Virginia Woolf used the sites and texts of literary tourism---authors' museums, literary guide books, and topographical descriptions of authors homes and haunts---to meditate upon the material, social, and spiritual relationship between authors and readers. Moreover, I demonstrate how Woolf's explorations of authors' museums and literary geography---sites and texts which materialize the act of literary creation---prefigure her analysis of women's literary genius in A Room of One's Own. In the third chapter, I return to the literary places of early twentieth-century London, tracing the setting of "literary and historic London" in Virginia Woolf s novels. I argue that Woolf reworked literary and historic London from a "factual" setting to an imaginary setting appropriate to her modernist experiments in fictional biography. The fourth chapter examines how E. M. Forster wrote about and engaged with "improving" literary places in London, and how for Forster these places represent the limits of the novel form in modern England, the limits of progressive social change, and the origin of urban dislocation.
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$a 數位化論文典藏聯盟 $b PQDT $c 淡江大學(2005)
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$a American literature.
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$a English literature.
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$a Geography.
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摘要
At the turn of the twentieth century, London modernized itself in part by creating sites which gave social and material form to the reading, writing, and understanding of literature. These "literary" places made order and meaning out of the city's rapid demographic and geographic transformations, and thereby became signs of London's modernity as much as its wider streets and grander hotels. From the museums and memorials dedicated to writers' lives and works, to the lecture halls and institutes dedicated to humane learning and culture, "literary" places in turn-of-the-century London became sites of memory and of education for modern Londoners. My dissertation argues that the phantasmagoric and "unreal cities" of modernism are not simply reflections of an alienating and always changing urban environment, nor simply the product of effete "groups" and coteries, but are complex responses to the institutional, regulated, and planned spaces of "literary" memory and education. The first chapter examines the emergence of these literary places in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century London, and demonstrates how they represented attempts at modernizing the city. The second chapter explores how the production of London's literary memory grew out of the organization of literary tourism in Victorian England, and how both Henry James and Virginia Woolf used the sites and texts of literary tourism---authors' museums, literary guide books, and topographical descriptions of authors homes and haunts---to meditate upon the material, social, and spiritual relationship between authors and readers. Moreover, I demonstrate how Woolf's explorations of authors' museums and literary geography---sites and texts which materialize the act of literary creation---prefigure her analysis of women's literary genius in A Room of One's Own. In the third chapter, I return to the literary places of early twentieth-century London, tracing the setting of "literary and historic London" in Virginia Woolf s novels. I argue that Woolf reworked literary and historic London from a "factual" setting to an imaginary setting appropriate to her modernist experiments in fictional biography. The fourth chapter examines how E. M. Forster wrote about and engaged with "improving" literary places in London, and how for Forster these places represent the limits of the novel form in modern England, the limits of progressive social change, and the origin of urban dislocation.
附註
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 62-07, Section: A, page: 2439.
Chair: Elizabeth Abel.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of California, Berkeley, 2001.
數位化論文典藏聯盟
合著者
ISBN/ISSN
049331220X