Freshman college students acquiring academic writing [electronic resource] : an examination of basic writers and ESL writers / Ditlev Stenild Larsen

Larsen, Ditlev Stenild
Bib ID
vtls000629000
稽核項
262 p.
電子版
附註項
數位化論文典藏聯盟
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$a Freshman college students acquiring academic writing $h [electronic resource] : $b an examination of basic writers and ESL writers / $c Ditlev Stenild Larsen
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$a 262 p.
500
$a Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 64-03, Section: A, page: 0885.
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$a Adviser:  Diane J. Tedick.
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$a Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Minnesota, 2003.
520
$a This qualitative, interpretive research project uses descriptive case study methods to explore the perceptions, feelings and  performance of ESL writers and NES basic writers during their first college writing class. While much research has explored traditional freshman writers, relatively little has focused on these two groups of less traditional college students, and even less has been attempted to gain insight of the acculturation and socialization process into academic writing as seen from the students' own vantage points.
520
$a The data consist of tape-recorded, transcribed interviews and writing samples from four ESL and three NES developmental writing students at three different stages throughout their first semester of college writing. The methods of analysis include thematic coding of the interview transcripts aided by the qualitative analysis software NUDIST to identify sub-themes and issues the students face as they begin their academic writing acquisition. The analysis of the writing samples consists of manual coding to assess the students' performance on two prominent process features of writing: development/support and revision.
520
$a The findings of this study reveal that both groups of students enter their first college writing class with very limited prior knowledge (perceptions) of the requirements of academic writing. During the semester the four ESL students progress positively and improve in their performance of providing support and conducting revision, whereas two of the three NES basic writing students remain stagnant. The interview responses indicate a positive attitude and acknowledgement of need among the ESL students, and a more negative attitude questioning the need for the class among the NES students.
520
$a These results suggest that as a consequence of the ESL students' prior attention to language, they see writing as crucial for their academic success in general. This appears to have led these students to be better motivated for the class than the NES students, two of whom see writing as only relevant to their writing class. The improvement shown by the ESL students throughout indicates that attitudes and motivation are among the most important factors for students' success in academic writing in general and in a first year writing class in particular.
591
$a 數位化論文典藏聯盟 $b PQDT $c 淡江大學(2005)
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$a Academic writing $x Study and teaching
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$a English language $x Composition and exercises $x Study and teaching
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$a University of Minnesota.
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$t Dissertation Abstracts International $g 64-03A.
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$u http://info.lib.tku.edu.tw/ebook/redirect.asp?bibid=629000
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摘要
This qualitative, interpretive research project uses descriptive case study methods to explore the perceptions, feelings and performance of ESL writers and NES basic writers during their first college writing class. While much research has explored traditional freshman writers, relatively little has focused on these two groups of less traditional college students, and even less has been attempted to gain insight of the acculturation and socialization process into academic writing as seen from the students' own vantage points.
The data consist of tape-recorded, transcribed interviews and writing samples from four ESL and three NES developmental writing students at three different stages throughout their first semester of college writing. The methods of analysis include thematic coding of the interview transcripts aided by the qualitative analysis software NUDIST to identify sub-themes and issues the students face as they begin their academic writing acquisition. The analysis of the writing samples consists of manual coding to assess the students' performance on two prominent process features of writing: development/support and revision.
The findings of this study reveal that both groups of students enter their first college writing class with very limited prior knowledge (perceptions) of the requirements of academic writing. During the semester the four ESL students progress positively and improve in their performance of providing support and conducting revision, whereas two of the three NES basic writing students remain stagnant. The interview responses indicate a positive attitude and acknowledgement of need among the ESL students, and a more negative attitude questioning the need for the class among the NES students.
These results suggest that as a consequence of the ESL students' prior attention to language, they see writing as crucial for their academic success in general. This appears to have led these students to be better motivated for the class than the NES students, two of whom see writing as only relevant to their writing class. The improvement shown by the ESL students throughout indicates that attitudes and motivation are among the most important factors for students' success in academic writing in general and in a first year writing class in particular.
附註
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 64-03, Section: A, page: 0885.
Adviser: Diane J. Tedick.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Minnesota, 2003.
數位化論文典藏聯盟
合著者
ISBN/ISSN
0496310875